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    Regulations Governing Interpreter Requirements, State-by-State

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Please email these to dan@360translations.com

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State

Certification/Licensure Requirements by Venue

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Website

Governing Body

Contact Person

Mailing Address

 

Email Address

Phone

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Last Updated

Key: Nat'l=National Certification required; 
State=State Certification and/or Licensure required
If it is blank, this means that no certification/licensure is required, or we have been unable to obtain the necessary information

Schools

Courts

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Medical

All Venues

None Required

Alabama EIPA Nat'l     Nat'l
 
The state requires a 3.5 or above on the EIPA for Educational Interpreters.

Must have licensure to interpret in legal and mental health settings. For more information go to http://www.360translations.com/burnsat/alabama.htm 

http://www.legislature.state.al.us/CodeofAlabama/1975/12-21-131.htm

ALBIT website www.albit.state.al.us

Alabama Licensure Board for Interpreters and Transliterators Cynthia Frey, Chair 5946 Monticello Drive
Montgomery, AL 36116
  lc143@juno.com  Cell: 706-315-8151

Home: (v/tty/fax) 334-297-2540

334-297-2540 3/22/2005
Alaska EIPA        

 

The state requires a 4.0 or above on the EIPA for Educational Interpreters. This went into effect September of 2005. You can find the source in the Special Education Handbook under Section 6 on Personnel. The state department of education and early development is one source of the handbook or you can visit our school district website www.asdk12.org and go to Special Education Department and there is an electronic copy of the Handbook. http://www.legis.state.ak.us/basis/get_bill_text.asp?hsid=HB0126A&session=21

You can find the source in the Special Education Handbook under Section 6 on Personnel. The state department of education and early development is one source of the handbook or you can visit our school district website www.asdk12.org and go to Special Education Department and there is an electronic copy of the Handbook.

              1/8/2006
Arizona EIPA Nat'l Nat'l   Nat'l

 

The state requires a 3.5 or above on the EIPA for Educational Interpreters.

Several websites for more information:

1. Interpreter Certification for Legal interpreting
http://www.acdhh.org/terp_legalcert.asp 

2. Public Comments on the Purposed Rules for Interpreter Certification
http://www.acdhh.org/rules.asp 

3. SB 211 -- Update - http://www.azleg.state.az.us/legtext/44leg/2r/summary/h.sb1151_3-02-00_health.doc.htm 

http://www.acdhh.org/terp_legalcert.asp Arizona Commission for the Deaf and the Hard of Hearing vacant (chairman) 1400 W. Washington
Room 126
Phoenix, AZ 85007
  info@acdhh.state.az.us  602-542-3323 602-542-3380 4/1/2005
Arkansas State State State State State Recent legislation has passed for state licensure for ALL settings. the finalization of what will be recognized for specific settings is going through rule promulgation now, thus more specifics will be available mid-year 2014. The licensure law recognizes, RID, NAD, EIPA, QAST, BEI and Cued Speech credentials and will identify what each credential will be able to do. These are Acrobat (PDF) files:

House Bill - ark hb1514.pdf

Senate Bill - ark sb870.pdf

              12/12/13
California EIPA Nat'l or State* Nat'l Nat'l Nat'l   The state requires a 4.0 or above on the EIPA for Educational Interpreters.

*RID SC:L (national) and CCASDHH (state) Legal Certificate are mandated as the only certifications authorized by CA Judicial Council. Thus the law mandates specialist legal certification from either organization before one can work in the courts.

Current law/act reads:

8910. Effective January 1, 2006, a person must be certified as a qualified interpreter, as defined in subdivision (e) of Section 8902, in order to do any of the following:
(a) Engage in the practice of, or offer to engage in the practice of, interpreting and transliterating for a consumer.
(b) Use the title "interpreter," "transliterator," or a similar title in connection with his or her name.
(c) Assume the identity of an interpreter and transliterator.
(d) Use the title "interpreter" or "transliterator" in advertisements or descriptions.
(e) Perform the function of, or convey the impression that he or she is, an interpreter and transliterator.

Currently EIPA is not the only certification that is being accepted. The california Code of Regulations (5 ccr 3051.16) requires educational interpters in California to be RID or equivalent by 2007. The following test are equivalent with a score of level 4.0 or above.
 
1. National Association of the Deaf (NAD)
2. American consortium of certified interpreters (ACCI)
3. Educational Interpreters Performance Assessment (EIPA)
4. Educational Sign Skills Evaluation (ESSE)
 
This is the information I have recieved from the Hard of Hearing Program Consultant for the California Department of Education. If after 2007 it will be the same or change we will have to wait and see.

Information added 7/11/12 per Billieanne McLellan, the bill proposed below, No. 2912, died in the Senate:

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE-2003-04 REGULAR SESSION
ASSEMBLY BILL No. 2912

Introduced by Assembly Member Goldberg - February 20, 2004

An act to add Chapter 16 (commencing with Section 8900) to Division 3 of the Business and Professions Code, relating to

interpreters and transliterators.

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST

AB 2912, as amended, Goldberg. Interpreters and transliterators. Existing law provides for the licensure and regulation of certain businesses and professions by the Department of Consumer Affairs or licensing boards within the department. This bill would provide forthe regulation of sign language interpreters and sign language transliterators, who offer sign language interpreting and sign language transliterating services for the deaf, hard-of-hearing, and other persons to consumers for compensation.

The bill would authorize the Department of Consumer Affairs to assess an administrative penalty of up to $1,000 against a referral agency or person who falsifies credentials. This bill would require the California community colleges, California State University, and University of California if the regents agree, to issue a joint report to the Legislature by February 1, 2005, that evaluates standards for the hiring of sign language interpreters and offers recommendations for student access to qualified interpreters.

Vote: majority. Appropriation: no. Fiscal committee: yes. State-mandated local program: no

The people of the State of California do enact as follows: SECTION 1. Chapter 16 (commencing with Section 8900) is added to Division 3 of the Business and Professions Code, to read: CHAPTER 16. SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETERS AND TRANSLITERATORS ACT Article 1. General Provisions 8900. This chapter shall be known and may be cited as the Sign Language Interpreters and Transliterators Act.

8901. (a) The purposes of this chapter are as follows:

(1) To provide for the establishment of minimum standards for the practice of sign language interpreters and transliterators in the state.

(2) To regulate persons who offer sign language interpreting and transliterating services to the public who charge a fee or other payment, and to impose penalties on anyone violating those regulations.

(b) It is not the intent of the Legislature in enacting this chapter to infringe on a consumer's right to choose a sign language interpreter or transliterator. It is the intent of the Legislature that entities offering public accommodations for the deaf or hard-of-hearing should continue to consult with individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing wherever possible in order to determine what type of auxiliary aid is needed to ensure effective communication.

8902. For purposes of this chapter, the following definitions apply:

(a) ``Consumer'' means a deaf or hard-of-hearing person, or any other person that requires the services of a sign language interpreter and transliterator to effectively communicate with and comprehend discourse between American Sign Language and English.

(b) ``Interpreter Preparation Program,'' ``IPP,'' ``Interpreter Training Program,'' or ``ITP'' means a postsecondary degree program of at least one year.

(c) ``Sign language interpreter'' means a person with the ability to interpret between American Sign Language (ASL) and written or spoken English.

(d) ``Sign language interpreting'' means the ability to interpret between American Sign Language (ASL) and written or spoken English effectively, accurately, and impartially, both receptively and expressively, using any necessary specialized vocabulary.

(e) ``Qualified sign language interpreter'' means a person who holds current certification credentials from the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID), the National Association of the

Deaf (NAD), the American Consortium of Certified Interpreters (ACCI), or an equivalent organization, as determined by the Department of Consumer Affairs.

(f) ``Sign language transliterator'' means a person with the ability to transliterate between English-based sign language and written or spoken English.

(g) ``Sign language transliterating'' means the ability to transliterate between English-based sign language and written or spoken English, effectively, accurately, and impartially, both receptively and expressively, using any necessary specialized vocabulary.

8904. Prior to evaluating credentialing organizations for purposes of subdivision (e) of Section 8902, the Department of Consumer Affairs shall convene a task force that includes, but is not limited to, consumers, representatives from organizations serving the deaf and hard-of-hearing, interpreter organizations, and the Department of Social Services' Office of Deaf Access, to provide recommendations and suggestions. Upon receipt of the task force's recommendations, the Department of Consumer Affairs shall have the authority to evaluate and approve credentialing organizations for purposes of subdivision (e) of Section 8902.

8906. (a) By February 1, 2005, the California community colleges, California State University, and the University of California if the regents agree, shall issue a joint report to the Legislature that evaluates existing standards for the hiring of sign language interpreters and offers recommendations to ensure that all deaf and hard-of-hearing students have access to qualified interpreters.

(b) The California community colleges, California State University, and the University of California if the regents agree, shall, in the preparation of the report required by subdivision (a), seek input from interested parties, including deaf and hard-of- hearing students, interpreter organizations, and representatives of community organizations that provide services to the deaf and hard-of-hearing. 

Article 2. Scope of Regulation

8910. Effective January 1, 2009, a person must be certified as a qualified sign language interpreter or transliterator pursuant to this chapter in order to do any of the following:

(a) Engage in the practice of, or offer to engage in the practice of, sign language interpreting and sign language transliterating for a consumer for compensation.

(b) Use the title ``sign language interpreter,'' ``sign language transliterator,'' or a similar title in connection with his or her name.

(c) Assume the identity of a sign language interpreter or sign language transliterator.

(d) Use the title ``sign language interpreter'' or ``sign language transliterator'' in advertisements or descriptions. (e)Convey the impression that he or she is, a sign language interpreter or sign language transliterator.

8911. The following persons are exempt from the requirements of this chapter:

(a) A person who engages in the practice of interpreting solely for religious organizations.

(b) A person who is working in an emergency situation in which the parties decide that the delay necessary to obtain a qualified sign language interpreter is likely to cause injury or loss to the consumer.

(c) Individuals who must meet the requirements set forth in Section

3051.16 of Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations, established by the California Department of Education.

(d) Individuals who must meet the requirements set forth by the California Judicial Council for court sign language interpreters, as authorized by subdivision (f) of Section 754 of the Evidence Code.

(e) A person who meets all of the following requirements:

(1) Has graduated from an Interpreter Training Program or an Interpreter Preparation Program with an associate's degree or higher.

(2) Is teamed with and mentored by a qualified sign language interpreter pursuant to this chapter.

(3) Identifies himself or herself to any referral agency or potential client as being mentored by a qualified sign language interpreter.

(4) Within five years from his or her ITP or IPP graduation date, obtains national credentials as a sign language interpreter and transliterator.

(d) A person who is licensed or certified in another state to engage in the practice of sign language interpreting and who engages in the practice of sign language interpreting in this state under either of the following conditions:

(1) The person engages in sign language interpreting in this state for a period of not more than 30 nonconsecutive days in a calendar year.

(2) The person engages in sign language interpreting by teleconference if the sign language interpreting services provided by that person are necessary because a sign language interpreter is unavailable to provide those services in person or by teleconference.

(e) A person who occasionally engages in the practice of sign language interpreting in a social situation that does not require a qualified interpreter pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. Sec. 12101 and following), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. Sec. 794), or the regulations adopted under to those provisions.

Article 3. Offenses and Enforcement

8920. A referral agency or person who falsifies credentials may be assessed an administrative penalty of not more than one thousand dollars ($1,000) by the Department of Consumer Affairs.

 

www.courtinfo.ca.gov - court interpreting

 

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Programs, CA Dept. of Education Nancy Grosz-Sager, Consultant     nsager@cde.ca.gov  916-327-3868   7/11/12
Colorado EIPA  National         The state requires a 3.5 or above on the EIPA for Educational Interpreters. House Bill regarding education interpreting - http://www.state.co.us/gov_dir/leg_dir/olls/sl1997/sl.30.htm                4/1/2005
Connecticut Nat'l Nat'l Nat'l Nat'l Nat'l   Currently, legislation reads:

On and after July 1, 2001, no person shall provide interpreting services unless such person is registered with the commission according to the provisions of this section and (1) has passed the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf written generalist test and holds a level three certification provided by the National Association of the Deaf and documents the achievement of two continuing education units per year for a maximum of five years of commission approved training, (2) has passed the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf written generalist test and is a graduate of an accredited interpreter training program and documents the achievement of two continuing education units per year for a maximum of five years of commission approved training, (3) holds a level four certification or higher from the National Association of the Deaf, (4) holds certification by the National Registry of
Interpreters for the Deaf, (5) for situations requiring an oral interpreter only, holds oral certification from the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, (6) for situations requiring a cued speech transliterator only, holds
certification from the National Training, Evaluation and Certification Unit and has passed the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf written generalist test, or (7) holds a reverse skills certificate or is a certified deaf
interpreter under the National Registry of Interpreters of the Deaf. (d) On and after July 1, 2001, no person shall provide interpreting services in a medical setting unless such person is registered with the commission according to the provisions of this section and holds (1) a comprehensive skills certificate from the National Registry of
Interpreters for the Deaf, (2) a certificate of interpretation or a certificate of transliteration from the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, (3) a level five certification from the National Association of the Deaf, (4) a reverse skills certificate or is a certified deaf interpreter under the National Registry of Interpreters of the Deaf, (5) for situations requiring an oral interpreter only, oral certification from the National Registry of
Interpreters for the Deaf, or (6) for situations requiring a cued speech transliterator only, certification from the National Training, Evaluation and Certification Unit and has passed the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf
written generalist test. (e) No person shall provide interpreting services in a legal setting unless such person is
registered with the commission according to the provisions of this section and holds (1) a comprehensive skills certificate from the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, (2) a certificate of interpretation and a certificate of transliteration from the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, (3) a level five certification from the National Association of the Deaf, (4) a reverse skills certificate or is a certified deaf interpreter under the National
Registry of Interpreters of the Deaf, (5) for situations requiring an oral interpreter only, oral certification from the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, or (6) for situations requiring a cued speech transliterator only,
certification from the National Training, Evaluation and Certification Unit and has passed the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf written generalist test.

http://www.cga.state.ct.us/ps98/act/pa/pa-0252.htm State Commission on the Deaf and Hearing Impaired Stacie Mawson, Executive Director 1245 Farmington Ave.
West Hartford, CT 06107-2668
  stacie.mawson@po.state.ct.us  800-708-6796   12/6/2003
Delaware          

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Per Loretta Sarro, Public Information Officer, Delaware Office for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

In Delaware , there is no law requiring a screening or certification test for sign language interpreters or other foreign language interpreters.  We do not have a State QA.

The Delaware State Courts has their own policy called “ Delaware Certified Court Interpreters Program” include sign language interpreters. You may browse their website at: http://courts.state.de.us/General%20Information/?CourtInt.htm

Some hospitals have their own policy on sign language interpreters. They developed their own contract with interpreters who are willing to work with them.

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) of the Delaware Department of Labor has it own policy on sign language interpreter services. They developed their own contract with interpreters who meet the clients’ needs and are willing to work with them. DVR has an interpreter on staff as an independent contractor. This staff interpreter is responsible to handle interpreter requests within DVR agency.

The Delaware School for the Deaf (DSD) has its own interpreter screening before hiring interpreters as DSD employee. DSD has a mainstream program for DSD students to attend the public schools part-time or full time that DSD assigns interpreters where DSD students are attending. Edward Bosso, Director of DSD has some information related to hiring educational interpreters for non-DSD students in other school districts in Delaware .  Mr. Bosso has better information for you.  You may contact Mr. Bosso for further questions at email: BOSSOE@christina.k12.de.us or (302) 454-2301 Voice & TTY.

The Delaware Office for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DODHH) has no authorization. They can’t advocate on this issue, but we can offer technical assistance. The Council on Deaf and Hard of Hearing Equality (CODHHE), a part of the Delaware Department of Administrative Services, has discussed this issue a few times on their agenda, which has no action for several years. Delaware is very behind on this issue we face.

About DODHH

The Delaware Office for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DODHH) is a part of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation at the Delaware Department of Labor in Wilmington , DE .  DODHH is a State government agency.  DODHH provides information, referral and advocacy. It does not provide a vocational rehabilitation services.  More information on DODHH website: http://www.delawareworks.com/dvr/services/dodhh.shtml .

http://courts.state.de.us/General%20Information/?CourtInt.htm 

http://www.delawareworks.com/dvr/services/dodhh.shtml

Delaware Office for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

 
Loretta Sarro, Public Information Officer

 

Delaware Office for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Division of Vocational Rehabilitation
4425 North Market Street
, 3rd Floor
Wilmington , DE 19802-1307

 
  Loretta.Sarro@state.de.us (302) 761-8275  (302) 761-6611 4/1/2005
District of Columbia          

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Sorry - I have incomplete information - please email me at danswartz1@comcast.net with your state's requirements.